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Diet & Nutrition
Edamame
Feb 2014
Suman Agarwal
Founder, SelfCare Nutritionist and Fitness Consultant Mumbai

My latest fi nd has been Edamame (pronounced ed-duh-mah-may). Loaded with protein, this green vegetable is also known as soybean. Some of us may remember this as a  snack served with sushi, but it is most commonly used as a side order or as an ingredient. Soy has been an integral part of Chinese and Japanese cuisine for centuries. Edamame is fresh, immature soybean, as the beans are soft, green and edible. It should not be confused with dry, hard and mature soybeans from which soymilk and 
tofu are obtained. Although they can be shelled and cooked, they are most commonly served in the pod.
Edamame is the only vegetable that offers all nine essential amino acids. It is a protein source at par with eggs or meat. It is low in fat and high in protein, which makes it a popular low-fat snack choice.
The amount of fi bre (9 grams) found in a small serving of edamame is the same that is found in four slices of bread (whole-wheat) or four cups of steamed zucchini. They are gluten-free,contain no cholesterol and are low in fat and carbs.


Reasons To Love Edamame

  • Edamame provide an antioxidant boost. Eating antioxidant rich foods has been associated with strengthening your immunity.
  •  They are rich in isofl avones that are believed to cut down the risk of breast and prostate cancer.
  •  They are also believed to make menopause an easier ride.
  •  They are high in vitamin K,which helps with blood clotting, osteoporosis and Alzheimer’s.
  •  They help in lowering blood pressure and protect against heart disease.
  •  They are also rich in vitamins B, C and E and provide folic acid too.
  •  Due to their anti-infl ammatory properties, they are beneficial for people having infl ammatory conditions.
  •  Fresh soybean, when eaten as a snack, reduces coughing and wheezing, and provides relief to asthma patients.